Lion King currently playing on tour in Chicago, IL and moves to Fort Worth, TX

Buy Tickets to see The Lion King!
Lion King Ticket Deals
February 2023
M T W T F S S
« Apr    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728  
Lion King Deals!
Lion King Tickets

Posts Tagged ‘Lion King Houston Texas Tickets’

PostHeaderIcon Lion King Musical gallery – In the dressing room with ‘Lion King’s Rafiki

From the opening song “Circle of Life,” Rafiki is one of the most beloved characters in “The Lion King.” Actress Buyi Zama brings life to the character with an engaging spirit that shines from inside out.

khou.com were invited backstage to watch makeup artist Jennifer Anderson transform Buyi into the wise baboon of Pride Rock.

Watch the Gallery Below:
Lion King’s Rafiki – Actress Buyi Zama

Lion King Actress Buyi Zama

Lion King Actress Buyi Zama

The Lion King musical is playing at Houston’s Hobby Center through August 12, 2012. Watch the Lion King musical live, Get Lion King Houston TX tickets Online. Avail $15 OFF on Lion King Sarofim Hall Hobby Center Ticket Orders of $350 or more by using code SUMMERTIXTN at Checkout.

Share

PostHeaderIcon The Lion King Houston TX Review – A Brilliant Collaboration of Theatrical Geniuses

The Lion King is currently playing on tour in Houston, TX beginning Tuesday July 10, 2012 at Hobby Center. Here is the Lion King musical review by Jim J. Tommaney.

Disney’s The Lion King roars into town with its menagerie of spectacle, stagecraft and human emotions grafted onto a pride of lions, showcasing what inventive minds can accomplish with apparently unlimited funds and unlimited imaginations.

After an opening with the mandrill Rifiki, a quasi-shaman, celebrating the birth of a lion cub to the jungle’s ruler, we are treated to a panoply of animal puppetry brought to exciting life by human actors. Some, like the giraffes and even the elephant, are remarkably realistic, and others more deliberately transparent but convincing because of their movements, such as the prancing oryxes and the singularly menacing and seductive cheetah. And there are solitary singers in the higher loges and birds fluttering in the sky and drummers on African tom-toms in the lower loges, and the animals parade down the aisle and enter to crowd the stage with delight. The spectacle grabs the audience by the throat, no, the heart, and almost never lets go.

Read the complete review {Via HoustonPress.com}

Lion King Tour will play in Houston, Texas through August 12, 2012. Lion King Sarofim Hall Tickets are in full Demand! Avail $15 OFF on Lion King Sarofim Hall Hobby Center Ticket Orders of $350 or more by using code SUMMERTIXTN at Checkout!

Share

PostHeaderIcon The Lion King Review – Musical Continues its Reign

North American tour of Lion King returns for its third visit to Houston, beginning Tuesday July 10, 2012 at Hobby Center. The Broadway musical continue performances at Sarofim Hall – Hobby Center through August 12, 2012. Here is the Lion King musical review by By Everett Evans.

Disney Theatrical’s megahit stage adaptation of the 1994 animated film logged another milestone in April, becoming Broadway’s top-grossing production ever. Its box-office total of $853 million surpassed that of “Phantom of the Opera,” now in its 25th year and still Broadway’s long-run champ.

But the Broadway production and North American tour (which has played to 14 million people and grossed $928 million) are only the beginning of this show’s worldwide success. To date, 19 productions of “The Lion King” have played to 64 million people in 15 countries across five continents, grossing $4.8 billion.

Besides the Broadway run and the tour seen here, there’s a company traveling in Japan, a U.K. tour that starts next month and open-ended runs continuing in London, Madrid, Hamburg and Tokyo.

Additions to the score by South African musician Lebo M and others injected authentic world-music influences alongside the Elton John-Tim Rice songs. Richard Hudson’s bold settings were influenced by African textile design, while Garth Fagan’s choreography mixed African dance moves with ballet and modern.

Yet it was Taymor’s extensive use of puppets and masks from various world-theater traditions that proved most crucial to the stage show’s unique visual profile. The techniques featured include: stylized African masks, most worn above the head rather than over the face; Bunraku puppetry, with large figures manipulated by teams of puppeteers in full view; and Indonesian shadow puppetry, with moving figures of wood and animal hide silhouetted on a muslin screen.

Taymor and Curry devised a different means for depicting each animal – as prominently displayed in the celebrated “Circle of Life” opening sequence.

The giraffes are performers on stilts that extend their arms and legs, with the tall neck and head worn atop the actors’ crown.

The cheetahs are puppets whose hind legs are worn like trousers, while the performer manipulates the puppet torso and front legs with sticks.

The zebras reverse that format. The performer wears the neck and head attached with shoulder straps, pulling the back end behind. The zebra neck and head is attached to each performer with shoulder straps, pulling the back end whose hind legs are manipulated with sticks.

The success of “The Lion King” helped pave the way for other hits showcasing various forms of inventive puppetry, from “Avenue Q” to the current “War Horse.”

As technical director of the Broadway production and this tour, David Benken supervises all technical aspects of the complex production, making sure they mesh.

Even though the actual load-in of the production to each theater takes four days, the tour manages to close one engagement on Sunday and begin the next two days later. Benken explains how.

“We use two complete duplicates of settings and equipment, so we can open in one city just after closing in the previous one. Otherwise, we’d need a week’s break between engagements. The things we do carry from each city to the next, besides the cast, are the wardrobe and puppets.”

‘The Lion King’ by the numbers

* 134 people in this touring company – 49 cast members, 19 wardrobe people, 18 musicians, 11 carpenters, 10 electricians, 5 hair and makeup artists, 4 props people, 4 stage managers, 3 puppet craftsmen, 3 sound people, 2 creative associates, 2 company managers, 2 merchandise associates, 1 child guardian and 1 physical therapist.

* 200 puppets used in the show depicting 25 species of animal

* 18 trucks (14 of them 53-foot semitrailers) to transport sets, puppets and other materials

* 7 days prep required to set up the show at each new venue (3 days of advance prep, 4 days of on-site technical preparation)

* 6 African languages heard in the course of the show: Swahili, Zulu, Xhosa (the click language), Sotho, Tswana, Congolese

* 45 wigs

* 3,000 stalks of grass required for yearly upkeep of the 20 Grasslands headdresses

* 100 Ants on the Ant-Hill Lady costume

* 12 Bird Kites in Act 2 opener, “One By One”

* 13 feet long, 9 feet wide – the elephant, largest animal in the show

* 5 inches long – trick mouse on Scar’s cane, smallest animal in the show

Read the complete review {Via chron.com}

Lion King Play at Sarofim Hall – Hobby Center through August 12, 2012. Lion King Musical Houston TX Tickets are in full Demand! Avail $15 OFF on Lion King Sarofim Hall – Hobby Center Ticket Orders of $350 or more by using code SUMMERTIXTN at Checkout!

Share

PostHeaderIcon Buyi Zama, Who Plays Rafiki in The Lion King – Interview Via BWW

The Lion King is currently playing on tour in Greenville, SC. The Lion King tour is looking forward to bringing the show to Houston, Texas for the third time from July 10 to August 12, 2012.

On the morning of June 14, the charming and personable Buyi Zama, who plays Rafiki, took some time out of her demanding performance schedule to talk to me about playing Rafiki all over the world, the wax figurine of Rafiki at Madam Tussauds Las Vegas and some siggestions for everyone with dreams and aspirations. Here is the glimpse of the Musical review by David Clarke at broadwayworld.com

Buyi Zama as Rafiki in The Lion King

Buyi Zama as Rafiki in The Lion King


As a child, you never saw yourself as a performer. Is there a unique and interesting story behind how you came to be in the beloved and well known and musical, The Lion King?

Is that a question? (Laughs) I never saw myself… (Pauses) I used to sing. I used to sing all the time, but anything other than just singing, I never saw myself as that. And, I thought everyone could sing, so I didn’t think it was anything special. So, yeah! (Pauses) My audition, I was hanging out on with a friend, so I didn’t really plan to audition for Lion King. And, they gave me a job for some reason. I don’t know. I still think they’re going to find out one day that I’m not really trying to do it; I was just at the right place at the right time and they were desperate enough to give me a job.

Rafiki is a fan-favorite character. What has been like playing this role all over the world?

You know, what’s great about Rafiki is that no one understands her, but everyone understands her at the same time. (Pauses) Me included. (Laughs) Because she is a mysterious being, you know. She is half baboon, half woman. She is just wise woman. I mean, I sing in a language that most people don’t understand wherever I’m at, except when I performed in South Africa where they understood each and every word. Everywhere else we don’t understand her, but they just get the character. They get what I’m about. They get what the character is about. And, that’s partly, or mostly, I think, because (Pauses) emotions have no language. People are actually able to let go of trying to analyze everything, and they just feel. So when you get to use that part of you, which is feelings, you enjoy something more. It’s just like when you love someone and you can’t put it in words, only because you feel it and you can’t explain it.

While playing Rafiki in Las Vegas, Madame Tussauds commissioned a wax figurine of you in the Rafiki costume. What was that experience like?

Buyi Zama stands next to the wax figure of the Rafiki character

Buyi Zama stands next to the wax figure of the Rafiki character


Um! (Laughs) Firstly, maybe I’m weird, but whenever things like that happen, I always just think, “Aw, that’s not me. They’re not doing this becuase… It’s just something that they want to do. It’s not… (Pauses) It’s not real.” I never believe those things, even though they are happening for real. (Laughs) I guess that’s the weird part of me. Because… (Pauses) I mean, when I was there to unveil the thing, I was, “Why is everyone taking so many pictures? It’s this wax thing. It’s not me, of course. It’s Rafiki.” And also, I think there is that separation, of course, between me and Rafiki. I always just think that Rafiki upstages me all the time. (Laughs) She’s that strong. (Pauses) It is mostly about Rafiki. It’s never me. I just bring her to life. That’s all.

Rafiki displays incredible strength in the show, always believing in Simba and being a good mentor to Simba. Do you share this personality trait or any other personality trait with the character you portray?

Yes. I basically believe in everyone, in my life. I feel that I always want to see the best out of people, be it my family, my friends. You know, I always look for that good part of them, and I want that to be seen by everyone else. People spend enough time doubting themselves. Yes, for that, and taking care of everyone and having everyone come to me for advice, I guess Rafiki and I share that. We’re there to help.

In your opinion, what is it about The Lion King that makes it appeal to such diverse audiences?

I think because it’s a good versus evil story, and, you know, people always want good, being good, to outshine evil, of course, to win. And everyone can identify with it. It’s a family story. It’s a family show. It’s one of those family shows that you can take the whole family [to]. And everyone, you know, the dad’s will identify with Mufasa, and the mother’s with Sarabi. And, you know, being part of a community is what The Lion King is about. Everyone can identify. I think that’s what it is. (Pauses) And, also, it’s more than just, as much as we would think that it’s just about animals, it’s a human story. (Pauses) You know, it’s very human. It goes to that part of ourselves—it’s that emotional center, again; you get to that part. And, the puppets! (Laughs) They make it amazing. People feel like they’re part of the story because they see how everything works. They feel like they, you know, are backstage. They see the gazelle wheel, and they see that, you know, of course, this thing is attached to these wheels that look like a bicycle, but they’re still able to use their imagination. You know, they’re not just limited just to what we want to show them, they also feel like they see how things work. That’s why.

Now that you have established yourself as a musical theatre actress, is there now a dream role that you’d love to play?

See, this is the thing; I wish I had played another role then I would be dreaming of playing Rafiki. (Laughs) But now, I think I’m playing my dream role. Even though I didn’t plan it. I didn’t ever… it’s just this is where it started for me. It just started big! So, (Pauses) I mean, I was in the ensemble a long time ago, when I started. You know, I was having fun then. But then they gave me Rafiki. They believed in me more than I believed in myself. Which is why I always try to make people believe in them[selves]. People never stop and see their potential, and I think I did not see mine. I didn’t know that I could do what I do, until someone else saw it in me and believed in me. Now, I always try to spark that in people and just encourage them. So, you know, this is my dream role, and, of course, I’m living my dream because I travel. That’s all I can ask for, really. (Pauses) You know. That’s it. I don’t know if I… Let me think. I’ve never actually [thought] about it. Maybe when I see you, after the show, I will know. (Laughs) But, I think I’m playing my dream role. (Pauses) Yeah. People tell me I’m pretty funny (Pauses). Sometimes! (Laughs) People tend to laugh around me, so maybe I should get into some comedy. I don’t know. (Laughs) But, I don’t know. I don’t know if there’s a role that I’d like… I don’t know. It hasn’t been written yet.

Read the complete interview {Via BroadwayWorld.com}

The Lion King roars into Houston on July 10, 2012 and it plays at Sarofim Hall Hobby Center until August 12, 2012. Buy Lion King Houston TX Tickets Online, Use Code SUMMERFUNTN to Save $10 on Orders of $250 or more!

Share

PostHeaderIcon The Lion King Musical Comes to Houston Starting July 10

The Lion King Musical will come to Houston, Texas Starting Tuesday July 10, 2012. Casting has been announced for the Houston engagement. The Lion King performances at Sarofim Hall – Hobby Center will continue through Sunday, August 12.

The Lion King’s eight-week Houston premiere engagement in 2002 was a big hit with the Sold-Out performances. Similarly at the Hobby Center was a sold-out six-week engagement in 2006.

Lion King Houston Cast Update:

The sardonic and deviously cunning “Scar” is played by Brent Harris. Dionne Randolph is “Mufasa,” the great warrior and ruler of the Pridelands. Buyi Zama is the wise baboon shaman “Rafiki.” Mark David Kaplan portrays the prim and proper hornbilled bird “Zazu.” Adam Kozlowski is the carefree warthog “Pumbaa” and Nick Cordileone is the wisecracking meerkat “Timon.” Mufasa’s son, “Simba,” the lion prince born to be king, is played by Jelani Remy and Nokubonga Khuzwayo is the loyal lioness “Nala.”

The three evil hyenas are played by Keith Bennett (“Banzai”), Rashada Dawan (“Shenzi”) and Houstonian Robbie Swift (“Ed”). The role of “Young Simba” is alternated between Zavion J. Hill and Adante Power and the role of “Young Nala” is alternated between Sade Phillip-Demorcy and Kailah McFadden.

The Lion King Sarofim Hall – Hobby Center Performances:
Tuesday to Thursday – 7:30 PM
Friday – 8:00 PM
Saturday – 2:00 PM and 8:00 PM
Sunday – 1:00 PM and 6:30 PM

Lion King at Sarofim Hall – Hobby Center will perform through August 12, 2012. Lion King Houston TX Tickets sales is in full swing. Book your Lion King Houston TX tickets in advance, Save $10 on Lion King Sarofim Hall Hobby Center Tickets Orders of $250 or more by using Code #SUMMERFUNTN at Checkout!

Share

PostHeaderIcon Lion King Tour Will Play at Sarofim Hall Hobby Center July 10 – August 12

The Disney sensation, Lion King will take stage at the Sarofim Hall Hobby Center this summer July 10, 2012. Lion King Musical national tour will make a stop at Houston, TX for a limited engagement of five weeks. The musical will perform at Sarofim Hall – Hobby Center from July 10 through August 12.

Lion King Tour Sarofim Hall Hobby Center Performance Schedule:
Tuesdays to Thursdays – 7:30 PM
Fridays – 8:00 PM
Saturdays – 2:00 PM and 8:00 PM
Sundays – 1:00 PM and 6:30 PM

The North American touring production of “The Lion King” has been seen by more than 13.5 million theatergoers and grossed more than $875 million to date. The Lion King won six 1998 Tony Awards, including Best New Musical. For more than 15 years, The Lion King has continued as one of Broadway’s greatest legends, where it still plays at the Minskoff Theatre. It has currenly played over 5,300 performances, making it Broadway’s seventh-longest running musical.

Lion King play at Sarofim Hall Hobby Center through August 12, 2012. Buy Lion King Houston TX Tickets Online, Use Code AFF$10 to Get $10 OFF on Orders over $350!

Share